Research Program on Standard Reference Framework for Cognitive Computing Applications

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The Cognitive Computing Consortium and Babson College’s Division of Technology, Operations, and Information Management have launched a joint research program focused on establishing a standard reference framework for describing cognitive computing applications. The program is led by Professor Ganesan Shankar of Babson College and Susan Feldman of the Cognitive Computing Consortium.

The research is based on an ongoing series of structured interviews with organizations who have created and deployed applications of cognitive computing technologies to one or more use cases within ...

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Considering Bias & Cognitive Systems

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When we examine the differences between humans and cognitive systems, we often point to lack of bias in automated systems vs. the unavoidable biases that humans bring to making judgments. But is that really true? The fact is that every time we select a training set, write an algorithm or design a ranking scheme, we are building in our biases of how the world is ordered, and what is more or less important in any category. We build in relationships ...

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SOLR, Bloomberg, Open Source ML Enhancements for Search

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Bloomberg is open sourcing a machine learning-driven ranking plug-in for SOLR, the widely used open source search system.

This is one natural opportunity, among several others, for search facilities to get smarter and more user- or domain-sensitive compared to any standard, off-the-shelf relevance algorithm approach.

While this is still a long way from cognitive computing, it does illustrate how companies with technical know-how, in this case financial publisher Bloomberg, are beginning to lay the groundwork for tomorrow’s more fully dynamic discovery environments.

Read ...

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Cognitive Liability?

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Tesla paid a high price in May, 2016, when a complex of issues involving its autopilot and vision functions—as well as driver overconfidence—caused the crash a Florida that killed one of its enthusiastic supporters and brought to the forefront the risk involved in operating a supposedly autonomous driving system that turns out not to be.

Beyond the obvious risk to life and limb, there lurks another unresolved issue that could turn out to be an equally important factor to the success ...

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2016 – Roundups on AI/Cognitive Computing

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As the days finally start to get longer and the year comes to a close, the trade press, and even the broader media, have a hard time resisting the urge to sum up what’s gone on in the past twelve months, and sometimes to look ahead.

For AI and Cognitive Computing, 2016 proved to be a breakout year in a number of ways, and we offer here links to three different and interesting perspectives.

In Software Development Times, Christina Cardoza enumerates the ...

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Consider Google Translate

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The New York Times Magazine features a beautifully prepared and presented article on the recent dramatic improvements in Google Translate brought about by deep learning technologies developed in the Google Brain division of Alphabet. But this is not simply an article about a breakthrough innovation, it is a nuanced discussion of the history, problems, and approaches, both failed and (sometimes) successful, that lie behind some of the most useful AI-supported facilities we use today.

As an example, author Gideon Lewis-Kraus notes:

“…in ...

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Where Are We With Cognitive Computing Today? Part 2.

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I recently had the opportunity to attend a focus group, sponsored by SAS Institute, on cognitive computing adoption outside the US. The group of early adopters attending this focus group was proceeding with caution. They had the bruises from past new technology experiments and don’t believe the hype around AI today. In each case, it was apparent, however, that they had support from high-level management, and that they were starting with a proof of concept, or several. We have heard ...

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SAS CTO on Viya™ and Cognitive

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The Huffington Post recently published an interview with Oliver Schabenberger, SAS Executive VP and CTO discussing the shifts in advanced analytics, the adoption of deep learning techniques, the increasing use of streaming data analytics, and the emergence of cognitive computing approaches in SAS product lines. All of these capabilities are anchored in SAS’s most recent Cloud platform offering, dubbed Viya™.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lolita-taub/cognitive-business-sas-an_b_13531248.html

Schabenberger takes a pragmatic view on how the AI-supported future will unfold:

“It is unlikely that AI will replace the processes ...

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Uber & Geometric Intelligence

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Uber’s announcement that it has acquired Geometric Intelligence and its 15 ai computer scientists can be viewed on the surface as yet another in a months’ long string of talent raids by the mega-tech firms on academic departments and ai startups.

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/05/technology/uber-bets-on-artificial-intelligence-with-acquisition-and-new-lab.html

At another, more strategic level, it could be viewed as more evidence of capitulation on the part of the mega vendors—an acknowledgement that the more “cognitive” problems in upper level decision-making by ...

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Where Are We With Cognitive Computing Today? Part 1.

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Cognitive computing is emerging as a significant part of the next generation of computing. Because it is early days in this new generation of computing, there is still no widespread understanding of what it is and how it differs from some of its relatives: AI, internet of things, machine learning, conversational systems, bots, or NLP. We see in both the US and in Europe that companies are very interested, but are mostly still at the experimentation and proof of concept ...

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