Legal issues

Consortium Presents – Emerging Standards for Ethics in AI – Fact or Fiction? AIWorld, Boston, Wednesday 12/5/18

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As AI has gained momentum and currency in the mainstream business conversation, awareness of the potential dark sides of machine activity has brought a new urgency to solving a host of potential ethical, legal, and regulatory challenges.

Clare Gillan Huang, Professor at Babson College’s Technology, Operations, and Information Management program will moderate a conversation with researchers and executives who confront these ethical challenges every day.

David Weinberger joins the conversation from Harvard’s Berkman Klein ...

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Consortium Presents – Cognitive Computing Track at AIWorld, Boston, Wednesday 12/5/18

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On Wednesday 12/5/18, the Cognitive Computing Consortium is presenting a half-day track of presentations and panels devoted to issues of Cognitive Computing. The Consortium is a Premier Association Sponsor of AIWorld 2018. Consortium Co-founder Hadley Reynolds acts as track chair.

Beginning at 2:00 pm, the program features four sessions. The opening session focuses on issues of leadership in today’s cognitive computing projects. The second session takes up the future of work and the ...

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Cognitive Liability?

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Tesla paid a high price in May, 2016, when a complex of issues involving its autopilot and vision functions—as well as driver overconfidence—caused the crash a Florida that killed one of its enthusiastic supporters and brought to the forefront the risk involved in operating a supposedly autonomous driving system that turns out not to be.

Beyond the obvious risk to life and limb, there lurks another unresolved issue that could turn out to be an equally important factor to the success ...

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Legal Issues: Can we depend on algorithms to make decisions?

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In the cognitive computing era, there are plenty of tough technical challenges. Their difficulty pales, however, when compared to the social and legal issues these new technologies raise. Increasingly, we rely on algorithms to help us sort through the complex factors that lead to making a decision. Often this reliance is not based on knowing whether the algorithm is dependable. Articles by Julia Angwin in the New York Times and ProPublica on Aug. 1st celebrate a decision by the Wisconsin ...

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