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Pursuing AI Research in a Context of Human Ethics

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The New York Times is reporting an nascent effort on the part of leading commercial companies with AI research programs, including Alphabet, Facebook, Microsoft, IBM, and Amazon, to work together in self-regulating the interactions of social and ethical considerations with AI research.

The Times report is here:

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/02/technology/artificial-intelligence-ethics.html?ref=technology

The big 5 are discussing a collaboration to devise a framework to insure ethical research and development efforts, as artificial intelligence and cognitive computing systems increasingly enter into and in some cases direct decision ...

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Google DeepMind To Scan Eyeballs

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Google has reached an agreement to partner with Moorfields Eye Hospital in London on a project to use Google’s machine learning to try to discover paths to early detection of eye problems from diabetes sufferers and from the onset of macular degeneration in aging populations.

Google’s health unit will use deep learning to assess over one million anonymized hi-res 3-D eye scans with the goal of becoming able to automatically diagnose vision problems in hi-risk groups. The hope is that ...

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AI First World for Google

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Google (not to be confused with Alphabet) CEO Sundar Pichai used the company’s (Alphabet’s) annual “founders’ letter” to paint a brief but interesting picture of the company’s commitment to intelligent assistant technologies:

Looking to the future, the next big step will be for the very concept of the “device” to fade away. Over time, the computer itself—whatever its form factor—will be an intelligent assistant helping you through your day. We will move from mobile first to an AI first world.

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Racing to be the Google of the Conversation Age

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Slate’s senior technology writer Will Oremus makes a cover story out of the current state of the experience(s) of engaging with our voice-recognizing consumer digital assistants. Looking at Amazon’s Alexa, Microsoft’s Cortana, Google’s mobile search app, Facebook’s M, and of course Apple’s Siri, Oremus puts together a thorough, critical, textured, and often amusing account of where we’ve been, where we are, and where we may be headed in conversational relationships with cognitive services.

Read more at Slate

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